27 May 2016

The Bones of Grace by Tahmima Anam

reviewed by Jane Wallace

A piano, a walking whale and shipbreaking are the seemingly unconnected elements that author Tahmima Anam weaves into a richly layered story of one woman’s search for identity and purpose in today’s Bangladesh. The Bones of Grace is the culmination of a trilogy which began with A Golden Age. The first two novels focus on the 1971 war of independence and its after-effects on Bangladeshi society. In this last book, however, Anam shifts the focus to the present day and contemporary concerns such as migration and social injustice. [more...]


25 May 2016

The Story of Hong Gildong translated by Minsoo Kang

reviewed by John W. W. Zeiser

One day a Joseon-era minister named Hong falls into a fantastical dream. The minister feels this dream is auspicious and when he awakes he wants to celebrate by having sex with his wife. Concerned about his propriety, though, she rebuts him:

 

“Your Lordship is a person of high position in the world and no longer a young man of excessive vitality. So why are you acting like a licentious youth in broad daylight and in view of the maids who spy upon this chamber? For the sake of your dignity, I will not comply with your desire.”

  [more...]


23 May 2016

New in paperback: Re Jane: A Novel by Patricia Park

reviewed by Jill Baker

Patricia Park’s charming debut novel, Re Jane, is a coming of age story. Its eponymous heroine, Jane Re, is a young woman who happens to be an orphan; her father was an American who she knows little about and her mother was Korean. Branded “honeyhol” or “mixed blood”, and called a burden by her uncle’s family, with whom she lives, Jane (at first) lives an oppressively humdrum existence in Flushing, Queens, working in the family grocery store. [more...]


27 May 2016

The Bones of Grace by Tahmima Anam

reviewed by Jane Wallace

A piano, a walking whale and shipbreaking are the seemingly unconnected elements that author Tahmima Anam weaves into a richly layered story of one woman’s search for identity and purpose in today’s Bangladesh. The Bones of Grace is the culmination of a trilogy which began with A Golden Age. The first two novels focus on the 1971 war of independence and its after-effects on Bangladeshi society. In this last book, however, Anam shifts the focus to the present day and contemporary concerns such as migration and social injustice. [more...]


25 May 2016

The Story of Hong Gildong translated by Minsoo Kang

reviewed by John W. W. Zeiser

One day a Joseon-era minister named Hong falls into a fantastical dream. The minister feels this dream is auspicious and when he awakes he wants to celebrate by having sex with his wife. Concerned about his propriety, though, she rebuts him:

 

“Your Lordship is a person of high position in the world and no longer a young man of excessive vitality. So why are you acting like a licentious youth in broad daylight and in view of the maids who spy upon this chamber? For the sake of your dignity, I will not comply with your desire.”

  [more...]


23 May 2016

New in paperback: Re Jane: A Novel by Patricia Park

reviewed by Jill Baker

Patricia Park’s charming debut novel, Re Jane, is a coming of age story. Its eponymous heroine, Jane Re, is a young woman who happens to be an orphan; her father was an American who she knows little about and her mother was Korean. Branded “honeyhol” or “mixed blood”, and called a burden by her uncle’s family, with whom she lives, Jane (at first) lives an oppressively humdrum existence in Flushing, Queens, working in the family grocery store. [more...]